Auriculotherapy Therapy, Cupping and Trigger Point Therapy

 

Auriculotherapy TherapyAuriculotherapy, or auricular therapy, or ear acupuncture, or auriculoacupuncture is a form of alternative medicine based on the idea that the ear is a microsystem of the entire body represented on the auricle, the outer portion of the ear. Ailments of the entire body are assumed to be treatable by stimulation of the surface of the ear exclusively. Similar mappings are used in reflexology and iridology.

Auricular acupuncture writers often claim that the method goes back to early Chinese sources, although there are only a few references in Chinese medicine texts that make that reference plausible. The main claims are that the Han Dynasty book Huangdi Neijing states that the kidneys open in the ears, so that superfluous substances of the kidneys are deposited in the ears, making the ears an instrument of diagnosis. Also, the same text states that many channels (Jingluomai/meridians) exit in the ear.

Auriculotherapy was developed by the French neurologist Paul Nogier in 1957 using a phrenological method of projection of a fetal Homunculus on the ear for reference of complaints and points for treatment. The method is an offshoot of Phrenology.UCLA Pain Management Center

In 1980, a double blind experimentally controlled research study at UCLA Pain Management Center department of anesthesiology UCLA School of Medicine conducted a research study by Richard J. Kroeuning M.D., Ph.D and Terry D. Oleson Ph.D. This study reported in the medical journal, PAIN, verified the scientific accuracy of ear diagnosis.  There is a statistically significant level of 75% accuracy achieved in diagnosing musculoskeletal pain problems in 40 pain patients.

Auricular therapy is successfully used for weight loss, addictions, fertility, hormonal imbalances, pain management, high blood pressure, anxiety, depression, insomnia and more.

 

 

Cupping

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERACupping therapy is a form of alternative medicine in which cups are placed on the skin to create suction.

Supporters of cupping therapy believe the suction of the cups mobilize blood   flow to promote the healing of a broad range of medical ailments.

Cupping therapy dates back to ancient Egyptian, Chinese, and Middle Eastern cultures. One of the oldest medical textbooks in the world, the Ebers Papyrus, describes how the ancient Egyptians were using cupping therapy in 1,550.

Cupping therapy

 

2012 research  suggests that cupping therapy may have more than a placebo effect.  Australian and Chinese researchers reviewed 135 studies on cupping therapy published between 1992 and 2010. They concluded that cupping therapy may be effective when combined with other treatments like acupuncture in treating various diseases and conditions.

 

A modern version of cupping uses a rubber pump to create the vacuum inside the cup. Sometimes practitioners use medical-grade silicone cups. These are pliable enough to be moved from place to place on the skin and produce a massage-like effect. Cups usually stay for 10 minutes.

Cupping therapy supporters believe cupping removes harmful substances and toxins from the body to promote healing.

 

Trigger point therapy

 Trigger point therapyTrigger points, also known as trigger sites or muscle knots, are described as hyperirritable spots in skeletal muscle that are associated with palpablenodules in taut bands of muscle fibers.

The trigger point model states that unexplained pain frequently radiates from these points of local tenderness to broader areas, sometimes distant from the trigger point itself. Practitioners claim to have identified reliable referred pain patterns which associate pain in one location with trigger points elsewhere. There is variation in the methodology for diagnosis of trigger points and a dearth of theory to explain how they arise and why they produce specific patterns of referred pain.

Compression of a trigger point may elicit local tenderness, referred pain, or local twitch response. The local twitch response is not the same as a muscle spasm. This is because a muscle spasm refers to the entire muscle contracting whereas the local twitch response also refers to the entire muscle but only involves a small twitch, no contraction.

The trigger point model states that unexplained pain frequently radiates from these points of local tenderness to broader areas, sometimes distant from the trigger point itself. Practitioners claim to have identified reliable referred pain patterns which associate pain in one location with trigger points elsewhere. There is variation in the methodology for diagnosis of trigger points and a dearth of theory to explain how they arise and why they produce specific patterns of referred pain.

Compression of a trigger point may elicit local tenderness, referred pain, or local twitch response. The local twitch response is not the same as a muscle spasm. This is because a muscle spasm refers to the entire muscle contracting whereas the local twitch response also refers to the entire muscle but only involves a small twitch, no contraction. Release of Trigger points are the principal cause of pain in the back, neck, shoulder and limbs.

Treatable disorders:
Rotator cuff tendonitis
Plantar fasciitis
Tennis elbow
Golfers elbow
Painful limitation of shoulder movement due to calcification of shoulder tendons
Bursitis (Bursitis is inflammation of a bursa. The major bursae are located adjacent to the tendons near the large joints, such as the shoulders, elbows, hips, and knees.)
Patellar tendonitis ( jumpers knee)
Tibialis anterior syndrome
Achilles tendonitis
Various sports injuries
Painful trigger points (acute and chronic painful neck, back, shoulder, etc. due to chronically shortened and thickened muscle tissue)
And many other conditions not listed above.